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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2017 7:59 pm 
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Riding weather is upon us, and many of us have been out for some time (some never stop - I can't say that this year lol).

This article may prove eye-opening for some that are either new to bikes, or consider themselves "good riders" due to their years of riding.

I find it refreshing to see empirical evidence putting a lot of the blame for crashes on the riders, rather than the tired old "f*&ing cagers!" blame game.

As usual, safe riding boils down to training, training, and more training.

Article:

http://www.msn.com/en-ca/autos/autosmot ... ocid=wispr

Complete report:

https://www.msf-usa.org/downloads/msf10 ... ft&src=syn

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 7:19 am 
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Location: North Delta BC Canada
It is interesting to read, but do you gain anything from it? Saying that X number of people go off the road on a curve, or rear end other cars doesn't really move me to change how I ride.

It seems to me they picked a bunch of accident prone people to test with.

I think it needs to be broken down further, with the people that had incidents, how many years have those people been riding? I think years of experience negates a number of these issues and then it becomes more of a bad luck scenario, where your wheels slip on gravel or oil, or some mechanical failure brings you down.

Maybe you saw something in there I didn't? I have to admit I did kind of skim it. :)


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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 10:42 am 
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After reading that report, what sticks out to me is the fact that almost every single crash smacks of operator error and could have easily been avoided, and that very few were unavoidable, and "caused" by outside forces. Slow down, ride within your vision, keep a space bubble around you, watch behind you, learn the limits of your traction (linear AND radial), always look for exits, learn to brake HARD, etc etc etc. Were these people doing these things? I suspect very few of them were. Yes other road users contribute/cause some crashes, but even these a well trained and alert rider would have a good chance of avoiding.

To your point about experience, many years of experience (to me) means very little, and I'm a perfect example. I took my first actual class after about 20 years on bikes (self taught, yet no accidents). Although I thought I was fairly competent, I was still forced to consider things I had never contemplated before. It was a real eye-opener, and even more so when I subsequently attended Roadcraft. Now THAT was a learning experience - even the level 1 class. I came away from these classes riding very differently.

I guess what it boils down to for me is that I think the vast majority of crashes are the riders fault, not the riding environment. Obviously there are hazards out there that can and will put you in jeopardy, but you can learn to mentally identify and physically avoid them before they happen for the most part.

I'm no expert - at ALL - but after doing a lot of reading (David Hough, Bernt Spiegel, etc) and taking some classes, I have a much better idea how much thought and preparation is required to be really good. 99% of the riders out there don't have it, and don't bother to get it. So they crash. That includes me LOL.

This thread might seem preachy I guess, but every spring I try to post something that will maybe make some people look at themselves critically before they get out there. Maybe think about doing some training or practicing at least. I hate hearing "accident involving a motorcycle" on the radio. So does my wife.

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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2017 7:04 am 
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Very late to the party here, but I definitely agree it's an interesting read!

Quote:
I guess what it boils down to for me is that I think the vast majority of crashes are the riders fault, not the riding environment.


Very true. All close calls I had in city traffic that made me angry at stupid effing cagers were actually the result of me being a bit too fast, maybe changing lanes a bit too quickly... the thing is that people who don't ride have no idea how quickly motorcycles can change lanes, pass, etc.

One UPS driver at work said to me that he really wishes motorcycles would slow down and not pass so quickly with so little room to spare. He said it was like magic: there is no motorcycle when he checks the mirrors and as he changes lanes there is suddenly a motorcycle going around him.

If I ride with that in mind, I never have any surprises. Even left turners that turn too late are not a problem because I can easily slow down. Moving with the flow of the traffic really helps me avoid most of the issues.

Of course there are issues like people running stop signs and red lights, drunks, deer and oil spills and gravel on the road, there could be all kinds of accidents causing the cars to swerve and so on but overall a lot of it is avoidable by the rider. Especially in the city, seems to me 99% of accidents I hear about and have some detail on it's the rider going too fast for the conditions.

As for experience, I'd say years alone don't mean anything, there are too many riders who ride 2,000 km a summer. It should be years and mileage, and even then mileage alone is not enough of an indicator, should be city vs highway as city is way too different.

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